Indian Cent Counterbrockage & Clashed Cap Strike

Submitted by JonSullivan on Fri, 05/29/2015 - 12:26

 

Indian Cent Counterbrockage 

& Clashed Cap Strike

By Jon P. Sullivan

 

Recently at a coin show I came across an indian cent error which was certified as being simply a “die cap strike,” and without paying too much attention to it beyond making sure that it was basically a reverse brockage die cap strike and was priced appropriately, I purchased it. Later, when I got back to my office, I noticed that the indian cent seemed to have more going on with it than simply a die cap strike. There was some design on the right side of the coin which shouldn’t be there if the coin was simply a die cap striking brockages. It “clicked” in my mind that the design was from a counterbrockage underneath the overlying brockage strike, and upon quickly looking up on Heritage auction archives some images of indian cent counterbrockages, I was able to confirm that it was in fact a counterbrockage with a brockage on top from a clashed die cap with the reverse die.  

 

 

 

 

 

Above: the obverse and reverse of the indian cent. To the right of where the brockage says “ONE CENT” is the counterbrockage, with the feather tips of the indian’s headdress visible. Also, just to the left of the brockage of the “shield” is the counterbrockage indian’s neck area.

 

The error type occurred through a sequence of steps going beyond a normal brockage or counterbrockage. I’ll go through the entire sequence:

 

1.A struck coin failed to be ejected from the striking, and another planchet was inserted on top of the struck coin.

 

2.The dies came together striking the two coins together, with the top coin receiving an obverse mirror brockage on its reverse side, and also sticking to the obverse die to become a die cap. At this point, the bottom coin was finally ejected from the striking chamber.

3.The die cap then began striking incoming cent planchets, creating counterbrockages of the obverse design on the coins. 

 

Above: an example of an indian cent die cap. This die cap was not striking counterbrockages, but it is an example of a die cap similar to the one described in point #3. (Image courtesy Heritage Auctions.)

4.At some point a planchet failed to be inserted into the striking chamber, causing the obverse die cap to come in contact with the reverse die, causing some of the reverse design (primarily the central area) to be struck into the obverse die cap. From now on, any coins struck from this die cap would show the outer areas of the counterbrockage as well as the brockaged central areas of the reverse design. 

 

Above: an example of an indian cent die cap. This die cap was not striking counterbrockages, but it is an example of a die cap similar to the one described in point #3. (Image courtesy Heritage Auctions.)

 

5. The coin which this article is about was then struck by that die cap, creating a coin with a counterbrockage underneath and a brockage over the top. The technical term for the error is a “obverse counterbrockage and clashed cap strike.” 

Indian cent die cap strikes of any kind are rare, and because of this, I have not been able to compare very many other “die cap strikes” to see if any of them have underlying counterbrockages, but the odds are that there can’t be more than a few of these in existence since for other series of coins, only a small percentage of the “die cap strikes” also have underlying counterbrockages. If you have any die cap strikes for indian cents or other series of coins in your collection, take another look at them, and if you see any design or lettering which is “raised relief” and is “normally oriented”, you very likely have a counterbrockage underneath that die cap strike.

 

Above: the coin on the left is the counterbrockage with clashed cap strike. The coin on the right is an indian cent counterbrockage. Compare the counterbrockage’s design position with the coin on the left, and you can see where the underlying counterbrockage design is at.

 

Indian cent die cap strikes of any kind are rare, and because of this, I have not been able to compare very many other “die cap strikes” to see if any of them have underlying counterbrockages, but the odds are that there can’t be more than a few of these in existence since for other series of coins, only a small percentage of the “die cap strikes” also have underlying counterbrockages. If you have any die cap strikes for indian cents or other series of coins in your collection, take another look at them, and if you see any design or lettering which is “raised relief” and is “normally oriented”, you very likely have a counterbrockage underneath that die cap strike.

Above: the coin on the left is the counterbrockage with clashed cap strike. The coin on the right is an indian cent counterbrockage. Compare the counterbrockage’s design position with the coin on the left, and you can see where the underlying counterbrockage design is at.

 

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